Tuesday, August 9, 2022

United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD): Statement of Tupac Enrique Acosta, TONATIERRA

 

United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD)

107th session (08 -30 August 2022)

Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

 

August 9, 2022
Statement of Tupac Enrique Acosta

Continental Commission Abya Yala

Secretariat, TONATIERRA


 

 

Dear Members of the Committee,

 

This statement is offered on behalf of the Continental Commission Abya Yala in complement to our two previous submissions to the committee which are now available on the CERD website for this session.


The International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD) states:

 

Article 15

Pending the achievement of the objectives of the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples, contained in General Assembly resolution 1514 (XV) of the 14 December 1960, the provisions of this Convention shall in no way limit the rights of petition granted to these peoples by other international instruments or by the United Nations and its specialized agencies.

 

In regarding the limitations on the right of petition within the UN system, the time has come to re-evaluate the methodologies and procedures of remedy for violations of the Human Rights of the Original Nations of Indigenous Peoples of Abya Yala [Americas] in a contemporary context of International Law, considered in the light of the fundamental principle of non-discrimination, and in affirmation of the collective rights of Indigenous Peoples as “Peoples, equal to all other peoples.”

It is the position of the Continental Commission Abya Yala that the prohibition against discrimination as a preemptive norm in international law, must be applied to the geopolitical relationships among our Original Nations of Indigenous Peoples and the settler state apparatus of the American states. The time has come to supersede the nefarious colonial Doctrine of Discovery of Christendom and to overcome the limitations on petition before the UN Decolonization Committee constrained conceptually but not legally by the “Blue Water Rule” AKA the Salt Water Thesis.

 

With the passage of Resolution 48/7 by the Human Rights Council on October 8, 2021, entitled "Negative impact of the legacies of colonialism on the enjoyment of human rights" the time has come to address the underlying issues of racial discrimination against Indigenous Peoples which have been normalized by both the domestic and international policies and practices of the states of the Americas under the legaloid tenets of the Doctrine of Discovery.


The Human Rights Council resolution 48/7 in recognizing the continuing consequences of the legacies of colonialism in all their manifestations, such racial discrimination, economic exploitation, inequality within and among States, violations of indigenous peoples’ rights, also called for Member States, relevant United Nations bodies, agencies, and other relevant stakeholders to take concrete steps to address the negative impact of the legacies of colonialism on the enjoyment of human rights.

 

In the process of review of the combined tenth to twelfth periodic reports submitted by the United States of America during this session, we call upon CERD to give effective substance to this call by expounding on the flaw of the US government’s position in the case of the Western Shoshone when claiming the right of “inverse possession” of Western Shoshone territories recognized in the Treaty of Ruby Valley (1853) through “gradual encroachment”.  The predicate to this position is the purported transfer of territorial jurisdiction from Mexico in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848).

 

Although CERD expressed concern over this issue in its Decision 1(68) in 2006, and the US government continues to refuse to address the recommendations of the CERD in the Western Shoshone case to this day, the underlying question remains unasked both by CERD and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights in the case Mary and Carrie Dann versus United States (Case 11.140, 27 December 2002).

 

The US government’s claim for jurisdiction over Western Shoshone territory via “gradual encroachment” is based on the legaloid, discriminatory, and repudiated Doctrine of Discovery of Christendom, via Mexico and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848).  This dimension of the case has not been addressed by CERD.  The only territorial franchise that Mexico may have illegally claimed over Shoshone Nation territory at any time is as a successor state in historical consequence to the purported claims of discovery by Spain under the Papal Bulls of Inter Caetera (1493).

 

And although the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues issued a repudiation of the Doctrine of Discovery of Christendom in 2010, the underlying issue of the discrimination and denial of the rights of petition articulated in Article 15 ICERD continues with impunity in the UN decolonization protocols.

 

This must be corrected.

 

Conclusion:

In his Final Report on Treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements between States and indigenous populations to the UN Commission on Human Rights - Sub Commission on Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities (22 June 1999), Special Rapporteur Miguel Alfonso Martínez made the following recommendation:

 

49.) It follows that the issue of treaties affecting indigenous peoples as third parties may continue to be relevant insofar as they remain in force and insofar as indigenous peoples already participate - or may in the future - in the implementation of their provisions.  Among the 10 instruments previously considered for analysis, apart from the Lapp Codicil, several others would warrant further scrutiny, among them the 1794 Jay Treaty and the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, both of apparent special significance for the indigenous nations along the borders of the United States with Canada and Mexico respectively.

 

Esteemed members of the Committee,

 

Recommendations:

·      The CERD should comprehensively address the systematic violation of the Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples under the regimes of the colonizing settler states of the Americas and their international borders, as is exemplified in the Western Shoshone case and the border between US-Mexico established by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848).

 

·      For the purposes of discussion on this theme, the recommendations of the 1999 UN Treaty Study by Dr. Miguel Alfonso Martinez should be integrated as a substantive foundation for review, discussion, and effective action to address the legacies of institutionalized colonialism in the UN system.

 

************* 

TONATIERRA: Submission to the United Nations Committee onthe Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) 107th session Submitted byContinental Commission Abya Yala


 

 

 

 

 

Monday, August 8, 2022

Consejo Nacional de Pueblos Indígenas en la Diáspora (CONPID): Sumisíon a CERD

 


 

15 de julio de 2022



A: United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD)

Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

CERD Secretariat UNOG-OHCHR

8-14 Avenue de la Paix CH-1211 Geneva 10 Switzerland

107th session (08 -30 August 2022)


De: Consejo Nacional de Pueblos Indígenas en la Diáspora (CONPID),

Comisión de Políticas Públicas y Liderazgo de CONPID

1930 Wilshire Blvd., Suite #504, Los Angeles, California 90057

United States of America

 

 

Estimados Miembros del Comité,

ACERCA DE CONPID

 

CONPID es un consejo nacional compuesto por una asamblea general de organizaciones e individuos indígenas miembros de las comunidades de Trabajadores Migrantes Indígenas en los Estados Unidos, agregado a la Comisión Continental Abya Yala. Este Comentario e Información es en respuesta a los Informes periódicos 10º a 12º combinados presentados por los Estados Unidos de América CERD/C/USA/10-12 ante el 107° período de sesiones del Comité Para la Eliminación de la Discriminación Racial.

 

CONTEXTO

 

En 2021, CONPID participó con el Grupo de Trabajo de la Casa Blanca sobre la Reunificación de Familias (Interagency Task Force on the Reunification of Families), formado por Orden Ejecutiva 14011 (E.O. 14011). Esta entidad fue establecida por el Interagency Task Force on the Reunification of Families (Executive Order 14011 of February 2, 2021 - Establishment of Interagency Task Force on the Reunification of Families).  CONPID fue organización anfitriona del Encuentro de los Pueblos Indígenas de Abya Yala convocado por la Comisión Continental Abya Yala en Los Ángeles, California - 5 al 10 de junio del 2022.

 

CONPID presenta esta sumisión de Observaciones y Comentarios con respecto a los desafíos emergentes bajo la Convención Internacional sobre la Eliminación de todas las Formas de Discriminación Racial relacionados a procesos y política de inmigración en Estados Unidos para Pueblos Indígenas y Personas Indígenas. La base de este informe es la comprensión y análisis histórico, integral, y colectivo al nivel continente de que las violaciones sistemáticas de los derechos humanos contra los Pueblos Indígenas de Abya Yala [América Norte-Centro-Sur] en respecto a las fronteras internacionales de los estados sucesores de la Doctrina del Descubrimiento de la Cristiandad (12 de octubre de 1492) continúa siendo normalizados e invisibilizados con impunidad cotidianamente.

 

En particular, la violación sistemática y discriminatoria de los Derechos Humanos de los Pueblos Indígenas en la frontera internacional entre México y los EE. UU. establecida por el Tratado de Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848) requiere una evaluación, análisis, y recomendaciones relevantes de parte de CERD en cumplimiento del derecho de petición referenciada en la Convención Internacional sobre le Eliminación de todas las Formas de Discriminación Racial así:

 

Artículo 15

En tanto no se alcancen los objetivos de la Declaración sobre la concesión de la independencia a los países y pueblos coloniales que figura en la resolución 1514 (XV) de la Asamblea General, de 14 de diciembre de 1960, las disposiciones de la presente Convención no limitarán de manera alguna el derecho de petición concedido a esos pueblos por otros instrumentos internacionales o por las Naciones Unidas y sus organismos especializados.

 

Además, tales recomendaciones de parte del CERD deberían tomar en cuenta la recomendación del Relator Especial Miguel Alfonso Martínez en su Reporte Final sobre los tratados, convenios y otros acuerdos constructivos entre los Estados y las poblaciones indígenas presentado a la Comisión de Derechos Humanos-Subcomisión de Prevención de Discriminaciones y Protección de las Minorías (E/CN.4/Sub.2/1999/20) 22 junio 1999:

 

49.  Se ve, pues, que la cuestión de los tratados que afectan a poblaciones indígenas como terceros puede seguir siendo pertinente en la medida en que mantengan su vigencia y en que las poblaciones indígenas estén participando o vayan a participar en el futuro en la aplicación de sus disposiciones. Entre los diez instrumentos previamente seleccionados para su análisis, aparte del Codicilo Lapp, existen otros varios que merecerían un examen más profundo, entre ellos el Tratado Jay de 1794 y el Tratado de Guadalupe-Hidalgo de 1848, ambos de importancia particular para poblaciones indígenas establecidas en las fronteras de los Estados Unidos con Canadá y con México, respectivamente.



(Vea: Sumisión de la Comisión Continental Abya Yala al CERD 15 de julio de 2022)

 

I.) Observaciones y comentarios relevantes a la Convención Internacional sobre la Eliminación de todas las Formas de Discriminación Racial relacionados a la temática de migración Indígena en Estados Unidos.

 

 

A.  Derecho a permanecer en su lugar de origen;

B.  Derecho del Indígena a la autodeterminación;

C.  Derecho al idioma primario Indígena en procesos legales migratorios;

D. Separación forzada de niños bajo la administración Trump y esfuerzos de           reunificación bajo la administración Biden;

E.  Grupo de Trabajo de la Administración Biden para la Reunificación de Familias.

 

A.) Derecho a permanecer en su lugar de origen

CERD Artículo 1, apartados 1, 4.

(Artículo 1, Apartado 1) En la presente Convención la expresión "discriminación racial" denotará toda distinción, exclusión, restricción o preferencia basada en motivos de raza, color, lineaje u origen nacional o étnico que tenga por objeto o por resultado anular o menoscabar el reconocimiento, goce o ejercicio, en condiciones de igualdad, de los derechos humanos y libertades fundamentales en la esfera política, económica, social, cultural o en cualquier otra esfera de la vida pública.

(Artículo 1, Apartado 4) Las medidas especiales adoptadas con el fin exclusivo de asegurar el adecuado progreso de ciertos grupos raciales o étnicos o de ciertas personas que requieren la protección que pueda ser necesaria con objeto de garantizarles, en condiciones de igualdad, el disfrute o ejercicio de los derechos humanos y de las libertades fundamentales siempre que no conduzcan, como consecuencia, al mantenimiento de derechos distintos para los diferentes grupos raciales y que no se mantengan en vigor después de alcanzados los objetivos para los cuales se tomaron.

Observaciones y Comentarios

1.         CONPID observa el hecho de que antes de la implementación de MPP y Title 42 por la administración Trump, personas Indígenas que hablaban sus idiomas Indígenas como su Idioma primario fueron por lo menos, 20% de toda la población migrante que cruzó la frontera suroeste de los Estados Unidos del 2014-2019[5]. Los migrantes indígenas provenían de los países de Mesoamérica - México, Guatemala, Honduras, y El Salvador. Además, su concentración más marcada fue en cinco lugares en los Estados Unidos, principalmente en áreas rurales y urbanas de Florida, Texas, California, los estados de la Appalachia del Sur, y el corredor urbano Noreste de los EEUU. Al comenzar con la política de inmigración estadounidense nombrada contradictoriamente como Programa de Protección de Migrantes (MPP) desde noviembre de 2021 hasta finales de junio de 2022. Se coincidió por tres meses con la política de inmigración Título 42, comenzando desde el día 20 marzo de 2020. El Título 42 prohíbe la entrada de personas de los países Mesoamericanos por una declaración para la protección de salud pública. Un efecto negativo es que el porcentaje en este momento de migración Indigena que permite los EEUU es menos del 1%.[6] La reducción de personas Indígenas a los que se les permitió solicitar asilo en la frontera por parte de Aduanas y Protección de las Fronteras de los

 

Estados Unidos y sus agentes de la patrulla fronteriza (conocido como U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) por sus siglas en inglés) efectivamente castigó a los solicitantes Indígenas porque la CBP, por omisión, no les identificó como personas Indígenas, pero por comisión reforzó la práctica de DHS al no admitir que tal agencia deportó muchos solicitantes de asilo que eran Indígenas. Por ejemplo en Noviembre de 2021, una observadora en Douglas, Arizona Identificó que entre 80%-90% de los “expulsados” (el término eufemístico adoptado por la Administración Biden en vez de deportación) por CBP a Agua Prieta, Sonora, México - eran solteros Indígenas del Altiplano de Guatemala; área predominantemente Indígena.

2.         Los agentes de la patrulla fronteriza al momento de registrar el arresto de un migrante en la forma I-589, registran a las personas indígenas como si fueran del mismo grupo racial y/o étnico como los demás que emigran de los países de su colonización, sin distinguir entre estados o pueblos y personas Indígenas y personas no Indígenas. Tampoco los oficiales les informan a las personas Indígenas que pueden autoidentificarse como tales, o cuando quieren ejercer su derecho los oficiales les explican que de hecho el proceso de procesarles legalmente puede durar mucho más tiempo, así usando el ejercicio de su derecho como forma de discriminación racial previa. Es evidente que hay cooperación entre los oficiales de la Patrulla Fronteriza y grupos civiles armados quienes actúan con impunidad secuestrando migrantes y entregándoles a la patrulla fronteriza en Arizona, Estados Unidos, sin identificarlos como personas Indígenas, ni conceder sus derechos de identidad y derecho lingüístico según su grupo étnico, racial y su nación Indígena.[7] Por ejemplo, recientemente se distinguió en una muestra del 95% de formularios I -589’s hecha por agentes de la patrulla fronteriza, que se utilizó la frase “other” (otro) en vez de mencionar la identificación racial y lingüística. Fuente de Información: Lea Rodriguez.

3.         La Patrulla Fronteriza estadounidense lleva una historia y un perfil actual de discriminación racial. Se muestra en sus comunicaciones internas, acciones del liderazgo del Consejo Nacional de Patrulla Fronteriza (National Border Patrol Council) y la asociación de miembros de la patrulla fronteriza con organizaciones que promueven una ideología de superioridad racial. Como parte de una conspiración, sus campañas racistas acusan a la población inmigrante y otras personas de razas no-blanca de planear y ejecutar demográficamente para “reemplazar” a la población blanca.[8]

4.         CONPID igualmente observa que los agentes de la Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) que al entrevistar y dejar entrar a los inmigrantes Indígenas en los centros de detención bajo la administración de ICE del Departamento de Homeland Security, no tiene un proceso de registro que permite la autodeclaración de las personas Indígenas.

5.         La Lic. Carolina Martin Ramos, Abogada de inmigración y derechos de los pueblos Indígenas y Co-Directora Ejecutiva de la organización ONG, Comunidad Maya Pixan Ixim y ex oficial de asilo para los EEUU también es testigo de las prácticas de agentes de inmigración de los EEUU en el Departamento de Seguridad Nacional (“DHS”, por sus siglas en inglés) incluyendo agentes del “CBP” y la Patrulla Fronteriza. La Lic. Martin Ramos, Esq. tiene más de 14 años de experiencia en representar y trabajar con agencias del “DHS” en EEUU y reportaba los mismos problemas y violaciones de derechos humanos y civiles como testigo con experiencia directa. Además, ella trabajó directamente con familias separadas en la frontera y demandantes en la litigación federal EEUU in the Matter of Ms. L. Así, la Lic. Martin Ramos tomaba declaraciones de familias indígenas separadas por la administración del Pres. Trump y bajo políticas de Cero Tolerancia.

 

La revisión hecha por CONPID del informe de los Estados Unidos como Estado Parte sobre la implementación de los artículos del CERD y las observaciones y comentarios de CONPID con respecto a los desafíos emergentes (identificados o no por los Estados Unidos) se limita a cuestiones relacionadas con la inmigración de pueblos Indígenas a los Estados Unidos. Nuestros comentarios e información a continuación se presentan en respuesta a los informes periódicos décimo a duodécimo combinados presentados por los Estados Unidos de América en virtud del Artículo 9 de la Convención, que debieron presentarse en 2017 [fecha de recepción: 2 de junio de 2021] CERD/C/USA/10 -12. Los Estados Unidos, como Estado Parte del CERD, informó al Comité del CERD el 2 de junio de 2021 con respecto a los informes periódicos combinados décimo a duodécimo presentados por los Estados Unidos de América en virtud del Artículo 9 de la Convención, que vencieron en 2017. Nótense por favor, que todas las fuentes citadas estaban originalmente en inglés pero fueron traducidas por los autores de este informe .

Nos dirigimos, en forma general, a los puntos número 17, 18, 19, y 23 del informe de los EE. UU., y abordamos los artículos relacionados del CERD: 1, apartados 1 y 4, y artículos 5 y 6.

Las observaciones de CONPID se basan en la implementación de algunas o las disposiciones de la Convención por sus artículos de CERD y las políticas y prácticas de las agencias de inmigración (y sus departamentos) de los EEUU en cuanto a la discriminación racial y étnica en contra de los Pueblos Indígenas migrantes y las personas Indígenas migrantes.

 

Migraciones Forzadas y Miedo a permanecer en sus lugares de origen

Inmigrantes Indígenas son parte de migraciones forzadas colectivas e individuales que los EEUU no reconocen como tales, aunque promueven proyectos con los estados de origen de los pueblos Indígenas con quienes cooperan conjuntamente en esfuerzos y políticas para forzar migraciones internas y externas, además del uso de controles irregulares en sus fronteras internacionales para continuar el uso de la mano de obra que favorece la economía de este país y otros sectores de la economía que favorecen a poblaciones socio-económicos y raciales no Indígenas migrados a los EEUU de Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador, y México.[1]

Por ejemplo, 54% de los padres separados de sus niños por la política de Cero Tolerancia expresan su miedo de vivir como deportados en su comunidad de origen basado en amenazas y violencia en su lugar de origen. El Presidente Biden declaró en su campaña presidencial que los niños separados por fuerza de sus familias son y deberán ser considerados víctimas de tortura.

 

CERD. Artículo 6

Los Estados partes asegurarán a todas las personas que se encuentren bajo su jurisdicción, protección y recursos efectivos, ante los tribunales nacionales competentes y otras instituciones del Estado, contra todo acto de discriminación racial que, contraviniendo la presente Convención, viole sus derechos humanos y libertades fundamentales, así como el derecho a pedir a esos tribunales satisfacción o reparación justa y adecuada por todo el daño del que puedan ser víctimas como consecuencia de tal discriminación.

Más de la mitad de los padres (7 de 13) informaron que continúan viviendo con el miedo constante a la persecución y viviendo escondidos de las pandillas o cárteles que los han amenazado antes. Cinco de esos padres no pudieron regresar a sus lugares de origen y se mudaron internamente, mientras que los otros han restringido el movimiento y tienen demasiado miedo para salir de sus casas. Como relató un padre, “Tengo miedo de volver a mi pueblo. Aquí en Guatemala, una vez que [las pandillas] te han amenazado, siempre cumplen esas amenazas. Tengo miedo de que sepan que estoy aquí, vengan y me hagan daño”. Continuó: “Tengo pesadillas constantes en las que me ahogo en un río, que algo malo les está pasando a mis hijos”. Otro padre informó que cuando regresó a casa, ésta había sido saqueada. Sin atreverse a vivir ahí, desde entonces se ha mudado a casas de familiares, donde espera que los narcotraficantes no lo encuentren.[2] CONPID observa que los EEUU ignora el derecho de los Pueblos Indígenas y personas Indígenas como individuos migrantes a la autodeterminación cuando se encuentran con los agentes de Aduanas y Protección de la Frontera (CBP), en los puertos de entrada terrestres o con la Patrulla Fronteriza (BP) entre dichos puertos de entrada. [3] Sus acciones de comisión niegan el derecho de migrantes Indígenas a solicitar asilo en general y particularmente cuando han sido forzados a salir de su pueblo de origen por violencia, desplazamiento forzado, y el despojo de sus tierras; violencia de parte de las autoridades del estado, por fuerzas criminales, o ambos.[4] Aunque son firmantes del convenio de Refugiados de la ONU de 1954 y el protocolo sobre refugiados de 1967, y la Convención Internacional sobre la Eliminación de todas las Formas de Discriminación Racial, los EEUU en su frontera terrestre suroeste no permite a los inmigrantes Indígenas a autodeterminar su origen Indígena y niega la oportunidad de presentar su identidad Indigena a los oficiales de CBP en los puertos de entrada terrestre de los EEUU y también se niega a reconocer los orígenes de su migración forzada como se debe hacer para cumplir con el derecho al asilo.

 

Esquema temático de CONPID

Derecho al idioma primario como idioma Indígena en procesos legales migratorios.

 

CONPID observa que en las diferentes sedes judiciales hay una práctica frecuente y persistente por parte de los oficiales de las agencias del Departamento de Seguridad Nacional (DHS) y sus agencias (BP; CBP; ICE) y del Departamento de Justicia y su agencia la Oficina Ejecutiva de Revisión de Inmigración (EOIR) de exclusión del uso permitido y provisionado de interpretación en Idiomas Indígenas. Para adultos Indígenas detenidos y procesados por la corte de Inmigracion[9], para las familias Indígenas detenidas en corto tiempo por CBP y BP [10], para los adultos en la corte criminal Operation Streamline[11] para los niños no acompañados detenidos bajo la custodia del Departamento de Salud y Servicios Humanos y la Oficina de Reasentamiento de Refugiados (ORR) del Departamento del Estado.[12]

CERD: Artículo 5

En conformidad con las obligaciones fundamentales estipuladas en el artículo 2 de la presente Convención, los Estados partes se comprometen a prohibir y eliminar la discriminación racial en todas sus formas y a garantizar el derecho de toda persona a la igualdad ante la ley, sin distinción de raza, color y origen nacional o étnico, particularmente en el goce de los derechos siguientes:

  El derecho a la igualdad de tratamiento en los tribunales y todos los demás órganos que administran justicia

 

Separación forzada de niños bajo la administración Trump y esfuerzos de reunificación bajo la administración Biden.

CERD: Artículo 6

Los Estados partes asegurarán a todas las personas que se hallen bajo su jurisdicción, protección y recursos efectivos, ante los tribunales nacionales competentes y otras instituciones del Estado, contra todo acto de discriminación racial que, contraviniendo la presente Convención, viole sus derechos humanos y libertades fundamentales, así como el derecho a pedir a esos tribunales satisfacción o reparación justa y adecuada por todo el daño del cual puedan ser víctimas como consecuencia de tal discriminación.

La Política de Cero Tolerancia de la administración Trump, desde enero 20, 2017, hasta enero 20, 2021, bajo la dirección del Fiscal General Jeff Session, negó forzosamente la interpretación en idiomas Indígenas a los adultos y niños Indígenas separados en la frontera por CBP y BP en los centros de detención provisionales del Departamento de Inmigracion y Control de Aduanas (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) del Departament of Homeland Security (DHS).

El asesor legal quien fue el autor intelectual de tal política, Gene Hamilton, no cuestionó la implementación del programa piloto en El Paso, Texas, ni tampoco investigó la implementación a una escala amplia y profunda detrás de todos los sectores de la patrulla fronteriza en la frontera suroeste estadounidense que resultó en la omisión de procesos legales cuando padres fueron arrestados y separados a la fuerza de sus propios niños, y en la manipulación y el desafío de los padres al presentarles documentos en Inglés. Sin embargo, Hamilton comentó a los investigadores de la oficina del Departamento de Asuntos de Veteranos (VA), Oficina del Inspector General (OIG), y solicitado por el Departamento de Justicia, que en abril 4, 2017:

“[El] Fiscal General Sessions ordenó que redactara un memorando que pusiera en práctica un enfoque de tolerancia cero para cumplimiento de la ley de inmigración en la frontera, similar a la 'Operación Streamline' y otros esfuerzos históricos en la frontera.” [13]

No obstante, hay amplia documentación de las prácticas de discriminación racial y exclusión lingüística en contra de personas Indigenas y de idiomas Indigenas en las practicas judiciales en ‘Operación Streamline’ desde el 2015[14]. Los resultados han sido catastróficos tanto para los niños como para sus padres reportó el organismo Physicians for Human Rights (PHR)[15],

Según las declaraciones juradas revisadas por PHR, los 13 padres entrevistados habían llegado con sus familias para solicitar asilo en los Estados Unidos y fueron separados a la fuerza de sus hijos, casi todos de manera inesperada y caótica.   En todos los casos

menos en uno, el gobierno no proporcionó inicialmente información a los padres sobre dónde estaban sus hijos, durante semanas o incluso hasta dos meses. La mayoría de los padres fueron deportados a situaciones peligrosas. Más de la mitad de los padres (7 de

13) informaron que continúan viviendo con el temor constante de persecución y escondiéndose de las pandillas o cárteles que los amenazaron antes de su salida del país de origen. Aunque en la mayoría de los casos la separación se había producido varios años antes, la desesperación de los padres se hizo evidente en el informe de los síntomas actuales en el momento de la separación.[16]

Casi todas las declaraciones juradas documentaron un diagnóstico de trastorno de estrés postraumático (TEPT) (11/13), lo que significa que sus síntomas persistieron durante más de un mes y continúan interfiriendo con su vida diaria, mientras que los dos padres restantes mostraron síntomas de TEPT justo por debajo del nivel clínico. Otros diagnósticos, según los médicos de PHR, incluyeron: trastorno depresivo mayor (10/13), trastorno de ansiedad generalizada (5/13), trastorno relacionado con el trauma (1) y trastorno de adaptación con ansiedad mixta y estado de ánimo deprimido. P.22

 

Grupo de Trabajo de la Administración Biden para la Reunificación de Familias

CERD: Articulo 6

Los Estados partes asegurarán a todas las personas que se hallen bajo su jurisdicción, protección y recursos efectivos, ante los tribunales nacionales competentes y otras instituciones del Estado, contra todo acto de discriminación racial que, contraviniendo la presente Convención, viole sus derechos humanos y libertades fundamentales, así como el derecho a pedir a esos tribunales satisfacción o reparación justa y adecuada por todo daño de que puedan ser víctimas como consecuencia de tal discriminación.

 

Las siguientes observaciones destacan las violaciones de derechos de niños migrantes Indígenas en el proceso de reunificación con sus padres.

Como primer paso, el grupo de trabajo llevó a cabo una revisión de los registros del gobierno para evaluar cuántas familias fueron separadas y qué les sucedió. Para septiembre de 2021, el Grupo de Trabajo, basándose en la información de la demanda colectiva de la ACLU contra la Sra. L que dictaminó que el gobierno debe reunir a las familias, identificó al menos a 3951 niños que habían sido separados de sus familias entre el 1 de julio de 2017 y el 20 de enero. , 2021.9 Debido a que el gobierno sistémico de los EEUU no proporciona traducción a idiomas distintos del español,10 las familias indígenas corren un riesgo especial de separación familiar y reunificación tardía.11 Sin embargo, debido a que el gobierno de los EE. UU. no reconoce la ciudadanía de las naciones indígenas y, solo registra la nacionalidad por estado nación y no territorio indígena; es difícil saber exactamente el número total de niños y padres indígenas que fueron separados.[17]

“Desde enero de 2022, la administración Biden ha argumentado, aparentemente por razones políticas, que las familias no tienen derecho a ninguna compensación y que los funcionarios razonables no habrían entendido en ese momento que las separaciones familiares eran inconstitucionales. [18]

En comentarios enviados por la Liga Maya Internacional, Comunidad Maya Pixan Ixim y CONPID al Grupo de Trabajo sobre Reunificación de la Casa Blanca, las partes observaron que:

En todo el sistema, faltan datos estadísticos sobre cuántos de esos niños son indígenas y el papel que su identidad indígena, incluidos sus idiomas, puede haber jugado en su separación. Además, nunca podemos olvidar que desde mayo de 2018, ha habido al menos cinco niños mayas y una joven maya que han muerto en la frontera entre Estados Unidos y México bajo la custodia de la patrulla de la frontera de Estados Unidos, o han sido asesinados por funcionarios federales.. [19]

Los funcionarios estadounidenses encargados del proceso legal de reunificación familiar, incluyendo la concesión de entrada a los Estados Unidos a padres que han sido separados y deportados, han ignorado y excluido a los indígenas. Esto ha sido evidente y constituye discriminación racial.

En todo el sistema, faltan datos estadísticos sobre cuántos de esos niños son indígenas y sobre el papel de su identidad Indígena. Esto incluye el idioma, lo cual puede ser un factor importante en su separación. Además, nunca podemos olvidar que desde mayo de 2018 han fallecido por lo menos cinco niños mayas y una joven maya en la frontera entre Estados Unidos y México bajo la custodia de Estados Unidos [20]


A diferencia del gobierno de los Estados Unidos, que buscó ocultar los orígenes indígenas de los niños que fueron separados a la fuerza y de aquellos que mueren de manera desproporcionada bajo la custodia de la Patrulla Fronteriza, aquí identificamos a cinco niños indígenas, información recopilada por la Liga Maya Internacional.

  Claudia Patricia Gómez González (Nación Maya Mam, 20 años) recibió un disparo en la cabeza por parte de un agente de Aduanas y Patrulla Fronteriza (CBP) en Texas el 23 de mayo de 2018, luego de cruzar la frontera.

  Jakelin Caal Maquin (Nación Maya Q’eqchi’, 7 años), murió de una infección bacteriana el 8 de diciembre de 2018.

  Felipe Gómez Alonzo (Nación Maya Chuj, 8 años) murió la Nochebuena de 2018 por complicaciones de la gripe.

  Juan de León Gutiérrez (Nación Maya Ch’orti’, 16 años), falleció el 30 de abril de 2019 a causa de una infección cerebral provocada por una sinusitis no tratada.

  Wilmer Josué Ramírez Vásquez (Nación Maya Ch'orti', 2 años y medio), falleció de neumonía el 16 de mayo de 2019.

  Carlos Gregorio Hernández Vásquez (Nación Maya Achi, 16 años) falleció el 20 de mayo de 2019, luego de un diagnóstico de influenza.

 

Información sobre aspectos positivos o desafíos emergentes registrados por parte del estado.

En la sección 110. del informe estatal de los Estados Unidos, “El Grupo de Trabajo Presidencial sobre Indios Americanos y Nativos de Alaska Desaparecidos y Asesinados fue establecido por EO 13898 el 26 de noviembre de 2019 para mejorar el funcionamiento del sistema de justicia penal y abordar las legítimas preocupaciones de las comunidades AI/AN con respecto a las personas desaparecidas y asesinadas, en particular las mujeres y niñas desaparecidas y asesinadas”.

CONPID comenta sobre el éxito de este esfuerzo para las comunidades de AI/AN y la necesidad de un enfoque similar para los pueblos indígenas que son migrantes que ahora llegan a los Estados Unidos en busca de asilo en la frontera suroeste de los EE. UU.

En el Informe de Estado de EE. UU., cita el progreso en el esfuerzo por documentar y abogar por la protección de las Mujeres Indígenas Asesinadas y Desaparecidas. El mismo principio de invisibilidad que previamente encubrió la victimización de las mujeres indígenas nacidas en los Estados Unidos, es el mismo principio de las prácticas de invisibilidad por parte de las agencias de inmigración estadounidenses en relación con los inmigrantes indígenas. Las prácticas discriminatorias raciales avanzan rápidamente por parte de la Patrulla Fronteriza en detención a corto plazo, por ICE en detención a largo plazo y por la inexcusable mala gestión de la interpretación en los tribunales de inmigración por parte de EOIR, y las prácticas de interpretación discriminatorias del DOJ al no identificar los idiomas de los inmigrantes indígenas y proporcionar interpretación en el tribunal penal federal, además de la subcontratación de compañías para la detención por parte del DHHS a ONG(s) que hacen caso omiso del idioma y discriminan de esa manera a los jóvenes indígenas no acompañados en detención. En resumen, Estados Unidos se niega a reconocer la persecución histórica y actual de las naciones y Pueblos Indígenas en Migración, por lo que sus departamentos pertinentes (DHS, DOJ, DHHS, DOS) y agencias de inmigración (CBP, BP, ICE EOIR, ORR) continúan actuando en la zona fronteriza como si los indígenas no existieran y que a las Naciones y Pueblos Indígenas se les pueda hablar regularmente en un segundo idioma, el español, no-respetando así sus derecho a interpretación y además a raíz de esa práctica racialmente discriminatoria se continúe con el presunto etiquetado e identificación de los Pueblos Indígenas como “hispanos” (hispanos no es una categoría racial reconocida internacionalmente) y por lo tanto, EEUU tiene que reconocer a los pueblos indígenas con sus derechos específicos según el derecho internacional, incluidos, entre otros, los estándares de inmigración según los protocolos de la ONU y la Convención CERD.

Es decir sin adoptar los estándares internacionales del UNDRIP 2007, OIT 169, y la Declaración Americana sobre los Derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas, los EEUU no se aproxima al cumplimiento los derechos de los pueblos y personas Indígenas en contra al racismo en procesos migratorios oficiales en los EEUU; Por ejemplo, La oficina de Derechos Civiles y Libertades Civiles del DHS, la institución encargada de garantizar los derechos de los inmigrantes en las administraciones sucesivas desde su creación en 2003, no está facultada para investigar e implementar acciones correctivas en las agencias infractoras mencionadas en este documento, sino que realiza una serie de informes públicos sobre orientación (guidance) irresponsablemente enviada a las agencias y utiliza dichos documentos de orientación no implementados como prueba del progreso en los temas, sin ninguna métrica discernible públicamente para medir la implementación real. Históricamente, la Oficina de Derechos Civiles y Libertades Civiles del DHS ha demostrado ser ineficaz en las quejas que se le presentan, y es ineficaz para crear un cambio en el comportamiento de la agencia en este sentido.

El gobierno de los Estados Unidos no tiene una oficina permanente en los sectores de la Patrulla Fronteriza, centros de detención, tribunales de inmigración o en la oficina de supervisión de ORR y DHHS que supervisan la detención de niños indígenas menores no acompañados en la zona fronteriza de cien millas dentro de la línea Sur Oeste. Como organización indígena nacional, CONPID repudia el intento superficial de remitir las quejas a una agencia diseñada para responder con una retórica pacificadora pero que no produce resultados evaluables y procesables que demuestren un cambio real en el comportamiento de la agencia con respecto a la discriminación contra las personas migrantes indígenas, y en contra de los Pueblos Indígenas en toda la zona fronteriza del SO de EE.UU.

Desde su creación en 2003, el DHS ha mantenido un enfoque estructuralmente defectuoso para hacer cumplir en sus agencias las normas internacionales y nacionales de derechos humanos. Además, durante más de dos décadas se intentó desviar y trasladar la responsabilidad de la respuesta del DHS a los problemas de derechos humanos en la zona fronteriza a la Oficina de Derechos Civiles y Libertades Civiles en Washington D.C.. No podemos ver como una oficina localizada 2,304 millas lejos del lugar de los hechos pueda responder a quejas específicas, como, por ejemplo, en la Patrulla Fronteriza del Sector de Tucson se ubicó a 2,304 millas del sitio de tres tiroteos hasta el momento no informados por la Patrulla Fronteriza al DHS en el otoño de 2021 en el área de Sasabe, Arizona, aunque CBP POE fue informado de ellos por Alitas Welcome Shelter. Una de las tres víctimas de los disparos fue una mujer Maya K'iche de 18 años (léase: indígena) herida por bala de fragmentación disparada por un rifle largo en su hombro derecho que requiere dos cirugías en el área del Buenos Aires Wildlife Refugee donde se ubicaba una milicia que tenía contacto con miembros de la patrulla fronteriza cuando sucedieron los tiros en contra de los migrantes.

El incumplimiento de las normas de derechos humanos, por parte del gobierno de Los EEUU incluidas las normas específicas para las personas Indígenas son la razón por la cual las agencias de inmigración que operan en la zona fronteriza ignoran la guía emitida por el DHS de la Oficina de Derechos Civiles y Libertades Civiles. Esto hace que dicho lineamiento de incumplimiento resulte en que la protección de los indígenas migrantes en la zona fronteriza sea completamente ignorada. La administración Biden como los anteriores no parecen darse cuenta con claridad de los hechos, tampoco se preguntan sobre el origen de esta invisibilidad y no tienen la capacidad de ver que los actos que cometen van en contra de los derechos de los indígenas. Se debe promulgar una Inter institucionalidad combinada con representación equitativa de las organizaciones de migrantes indígenas en una junta civil para definir el alcance de las violaciones de derechos y con la participación de actores de la sociedad civil que puedan demostrar dónde se deben cambiar las prácticas racialmente discriminatorias, que podrían impactar positivamente a los migrantes Indígenas, como tales.


Las acciones estatales han impactado negativamente a Mujeres Indígenas Asesinadas y Desaparecidas. A diferencia del EO 13898 establecido para el Grupo de Trabajo Presidencial sobre Mujeres Indígenas Americanas y Alaska Desaparecidas y Asesinadas, no se ha establecido ningún grupo de trabajo permanente para el alcance de estas graves violaciones por parte de los Estados Unidos. Estados Unidos, de hecho, está violando su propia EO 13166 emitida en 2002, con respecto a los derechos lingüísticos de las personas con inglés limitado que acceden a los servicios federales, incluidos los inmigrantes en entornos de inmigración oficial en la zona fronteriza.

Preguntas sometidas al Comité CERD para el repaso de los EEUU y su cumplimiento con el  CERD.

1.         ¿Por qué los Estados Unidos viola el convenio sobre refugiados de 1954 de las Naciones Unidas y los protocolos asociados de 1967, por su práctica bajo su política de Título 42 al expulsar migrantes indígenas?

2.         ¿Porque y hasta cuando los EEUU seguirá violando al principio de non-refoulement de migrantes Indígenas quienes buscan asilo basado en su miedo creíble y son devueltos a México y porque la patrulla fronteriza de los EEUU expulsa migrantes Indígenas de El Salvador, Honduras, y Guatemala, a México sin cumplir con el convenio de Refugiados de la ONU de 1954?

3.         ¿Cuando los EEUU va efectivamente a enforzar la orden ejecutiva 13166 (Bill Clinton: 2000[21]), que exige evaluar las necesidades lingüísticas de personas Inmigrantes Indígenas de habla limitada o que no hablan inglés y que hablan un idioma Indígena como su idioma principal, particularmente las poblaciones de individuos hablantes de idiomas provenientes de pueblos y naciones Indígenas de Mesoamérica? ¿Cuando implementará un plan para proveer servicio de interpretación en idiomas indígenas como primer idioma, y reportar la frecuencia de tales idiomas como requiere el orden ejecutivo 13166? Dado que la orden ejecutiva fue autorizada en 2003, hace 19 años (¿es decir que ya 5 administraciones fallaron en implementarla y aún no está efectivamente implementada?

4.         ¿Por qué los EEUU proveen interpretación para China y Hindi, o en Kryol de Haití en sus cortes de inmigración, pero no en idiomas que tienen una existencia de 4,000 años, como son los idiomas indígenas de Mesoamérica?

5.         ¿Por qué el anuario estadístico anual (statistical yearbook) de la Oficina Ejecutiva de Revisión de Inmigración (EOIR) cuenta con 25 idiomas más frecuentes, pero el idioma número 4 es el idioma "desconocido"?

6.         ¿Por qué no se provee interpretación para los hablantes de idiomas indígenas de Mesoamérica si necesitan acceso lingüístico en los procedimientos legales de corte de inmigración por ser "hablantes limitados de inglés”? Esta es una forma de discriminación clara hacia los hablantes indígenas.

7.         ¿Cuándo fue la última encuesta ordenada sobre los idiomas primarios presentes de los Inmigrantes Indígenas por el Departamento de Homeland Security y completada por la Patrulla Fronteriza e independientemente de la Patrulla Fronteriza por ICE en los centros de detención bajo la administración y contratistas? Qué porcentaje de sus centros legales de procesamiento (legal processing Centers) y las estaciones de la patrulla fronteriza) reportaron, y sobre cuál periodo, ¿y cuáles son las frecuencias de los Idiomas Indígenas presentes?

8.         ¿Cómo es posible que los EEUU permita en la corte de inmigración del departamento de justicia, evidencia de violación de entrada ilegal de un inmigrante con documentos en un idioma que este individuo no entiende y respuestas en el idioma español a la interrogación preliminar de los agentes de la patrulla frontera, cuando el primer Idioma de un inmigrante es un idioma Indígena, perjudicando así su derecho de contestar en su idioma primario, además de obligarlo a someter documentación en un idioma que desconoce? Esto representa discriminación en contra del derecho lingüístico, por ignorar o negar el idioma primario Indígena y no documentar su identidad racial.

9.         ¿ Por qué los EEUU permite esta discriminación comenzando (por la práctica discriminatoria descrito en número 4 arriba), y luego permite extenderlo a los centros de detención para menores de edad separados de sus padres, y en los centros de detención de adultos para mujeres y hombres, y la corte criminal?

 

____________________________________________________________

 

 

 

[1]          Building Civil Society among Indigenous Migrants, Jonathan Fox And Gaspar Rivera-Salgado,Indigenous Mexican Migrants in United States, La Jolla: University of California, San Diego, Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, published in (2004): 171-201, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas/Miguel Angel Porrúa

[2]          “Part of my heart was torn away, What the U.S. Government Owes the Tortured Survivors of Family Separation”, April 2022, p.20 Physicians for Human Rights.

[3]          Indigenous Language Speaking Immigrants (ILSI) in the US Immigration System, a technical review. 26 May, 2015, Ama Consultants

[4]          Indigenous Peoples' Rights to Exist, Self Determination, Language and Due Process in Migration, September 2019, Patrisia Gonzales, Juanita Cabrera Lopez, Rachel Starks, DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.12739.14883, Families Belong Together”: Tens of Thousands Across the U.S. Protest Trump’s Zero Tolerance Policy, July 2, 2018 Democracy Now, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3LOxcAuLxk&t=73s

[5]          Gentry, B., Richardson, M., Lopez, D. P., & Watkins, J. (2021). Indigenous Language Migration along the US Southwestern Border—the View from Arizona. Chance, 34(3), 47-55., Do My Rights Matter? The Mistreatment of Unaccompanied Children in CBP Custody, section: Can You Hear Me? The Invisibilization of Indigenous Immigrants, Sofia Aumann, Genesis Barrios, Maria Valentina Eman, Lia Mora, Rosario Paz, and Janette Vargas, October, 2020, Americans for Immigrant Justice,

https://aijustice.org/do-my-rights-matter-the-mistreatment-of-unaccompanied-children-in-cbp-custody/ #hear

[6]          Observación de la Oficina de Idiomas Indigenas en Alitas Welcome Center continua desde Nov. 2021 a Julio 15, 2022.

[7]          In Plain Sight: Uncovering Border Patrol's Relationship with Far-Right Militias at the Southern Border, Freddy Cruz, Southern Poverty Law Center, July 29, 2021

[8]          The Legacy of Racism within the U.S. Border Patrol, American Immigration Council, Katy Murdza, Walter Ewing, February 10, 2021, Border Patrol Union President Attends Hate-Group Conference and Embraces the Same Racist Fictions as Several Domestic Terrorists, Zachary Mueller, June 22, 2022, America’s Voice,

[9]          Op cit Ama Consultants, p.26

[10]        Op cit Ama Consultants, p.22

[11]        Op cit Ama Consultants, p.34

[12]        Op cit, Ama Consultants, p. 38

[13]        Review of the Department of Justice’s Planning and Implementation of Its Zero Tolerance Policy and Its Coordination with the Departments of Homeland Security and Health and Human Services, JANUARY 2021 (REVISED),

file:///C:/Users/User/Downloads/DOG%20OIG%20Report_Zero%20Tolerance%20Review.pdf.

 

 

[14]        Op cit, Ama Consultants, 34-37.

[16]        Op cit, PHR, p.3

[17]        Op cit, PHR, p.7

[18]        Op cit, PHR, p.9

[19]        Carta a Michelle Brané Executive Director White House Family Reunification Task Force, RE: Indigenous Peoples Recommendations to the Interagency Task Force on the Reunification of Families Specific to the Rights of Indigenous Children Forcibly Separated between January 20, 2017- January 20, 2021, in Connection with the Zero-Tolerance Policy, p 3, The International Mayan League, Comunidad Maya Pixan Ixim, The National Council of Indigenous Peoples in the Diaspora, June 4, 2021

[20]        Op cit , International Mayan League et al,

Carta a Michelle Brané Executive Director White House Family Reunification Task Force, RE: Indigenous Peoples Recommendations to the Interagency Task Force on the Reunification of Families Specific to the Rights of Indigenous Children Forcibly Separated between January 20, 2017- January 20, 2021, in Connection with the Zero-Tolerance Policy, The International Mayan League, Comunidad Maya Pixan Ixim, The National Council of Indigenous Peoples in the Diaspora, June 4, 2021

[21]        Department of Justice, US Federal Executive, https://www.justice.gov/crt/executive-order-13166.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lista de documentos de referencia en el documento enviado por el

Consejo Nacional de los Pueblos Indigenas en la Diáspora (CONPID)

al Comité de CERD de la Organización de las Naciones Unidos

 

 

1.         Border Patrol Union President Attends Hate-Group Conference and Embraces the Same Racist Fictions as Several Domestic Terrorists, Zachary Mueller,  June 22, 2022, America’s Voice, https://americasvoice.org/blog/border-patrol-union-president-attends-hate-group-conference-and-embraces-the-same-racist-fictions-as-several-domestic-terrorists/

 

2.         Building Civil Society among Indigenous Migrants, Jonathan Fox And Gaspar Rivera-Salgado ,Indigenous Mexican Migrants in United States, La Jolla: University of California, San Diego, Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, published in (2004): 171-201,  Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas/Miguel Angel Porrúa. file:///C:/Users/User/Downloads/Building_Migrant_Civil_Society_Indigenou.pdf

 

3.         Carta a  Michelle Brané, Executive Director White House Family Reunification Task Force, RE: Indigenous Peoples Recommendations to the Interagency Task Force on the Reunification of Families Specific to the Rights of Indigenous Children Forcibly Separated between January 20, 2017- January 20, 2021, in Connection with the Zero-Tolerance Policy, The International Mayan League, Comunidad Maya Pixan Ixim, The National Council of Indigenous Peoples in the Diaspora, June 4, 2021

 

4.         “Families Belong Together”: Tens of Thousands Across the U.S. Protest Trump’s Zero Tolerance Policy, July 2, 2018 Democracy Now https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3LOxcAuLxk&t=73s

 

5.         Federal Government 's Renewed Commitment to Language Access Obligations Under Executive Order 13166 https://www.lep.gov/sites/lep/files/resources/AG_021711_EO_13166_Memo_to_Agencies_with_Supplement.pdf

 

6.         In Plain Sight: Uncovering Border Patrol's Relationship with Far-Right Militias at the Southern Border, Freddy Cruz, Southern Poverty Law Center, July 29, 2021

 

7.         Indigenous diaspora: Expelled to northern Mexico and invisible in US immigration courts

Maria Ramos Pacheco and René Kladzyk/El Paso Matters and Veronica Martinez/La Verdad, may 12, 2021, https://www.elpasotimes.com/story/news/2021/05/12/us-immigration-courts-indigenous-migrants-expelled-northern-mexico-invisible/5004540001/

 

 

8.         Indigenous Language Migration along the US Southwestern Border—the View from Arizona. Gentry, B., Richardson, M., Lopez, D. P., & Watkins, J. (2021),  Chance, 34(3), 47-55., Do My Rights Matter? The Mistreatment of Unaccompanied Children in CBP Custody, section: Can You Hear Me? The Invisibilization of Indigenous Immigrants, Sofia Aumann, Genesis Barrios, Maria Valentina Eman, Lia Mora, Rosario Paz, and Janette Vargas, October, 2020, Americans for Immigrant Justice. https://aijustice.org/do-my-rights-matter-the-mistreatment-of-unaccompanied-children-in-cbp-custody/#hear

 

9.         Indigenous Language Speaking Immigrants (ILSI) in the US Immigration System, a technical review, 26 May, 2015,  Ama Consultants. http://www.amaconsultants.org/uploads/Exclusion_of_Indigenous%20Languages_in_US_Immigration_System_19_June2015version_i.pdf

 

 

10.       Indigenous Peoples' Rights to Exist, Self Determination, Language and Due Process in Migration,  September 2019, Patrisia Gonzales, Juanita Cabrera Lopez, Rachel Starks, DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.12739.14883ñ. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/337681894_Indigenous_Peoples%27_Rights_to_Exist_Self_Determination_Language_and_Due_Process_in_Migration

 

11.       “Part of my heart was torn away, What the U.S. Government Owes the Tortured Survivors of Family Separation”, April 2022, p.20  Physicians for Human Rights. https://phr.org/our-work/resources/part-of-my-heart-was-torn-away/

 

12.       Review of the Department of Justice’s Planning and Implementation of Its Zero Tolerance Policy and Its Coordination with the Departments of Homeland Security and Health and Human Services, JANUARY 2021 (REVISED). file:///C:/Users/User/Downloads/DOG%20OIG%20Report_Zero%20Tolerance%20Review.pdf

 

13.       The Legacy of Racism within the U.S. Border Patrol, American Immigration Council, Katy Murdza, Walter Ewing, February 10, 2021. https://www.americanimmigrationcouncil.org/research/legacy-racism-within-us-border-patrol

 

14.       USCIS Records Reveal Systemic Disparities in Asylum Decisions, Human Rights First, May, 2022. periodo del reporte: los años fiscales 2016 a 27 de mayo de 2021. https://www.humanrightsfirst.org/sites/default/files/AsylumOfficeFOIASystemicDisparities.pdf